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Welcome to Irwell Press

We distribute a wide range of high quality railway books, from those covering the main lines of Britains railway network to highly detailed locomotive histories. We have a growing list of industrial railway books and a popular series of colour books which have recently been expanded to include buses. In addition to our range of railway books we also publish two railway magazines, British Railways Illustrated and Railway Bylines. As well as the latest issue you can also find back issues of these magazines and a comprehensive index. If you cannot find the book or magazine your are looking for then you can check our forthcoming books section, or alternatively give us a call on 01525 861 888 and we will be happy to help.

Fed up wandering the streets trying to find BRILL or BYLINES. Well now you can find them on-line. Simply click the image on the right and be directed to our 'Magazine Retailer Search engine'. Type in the magazine title, your post-code and it will tell you where you can find the mags or indeed where you can order them.

Have fun.

This months news

Hello and welcome to another month at Irwell Press. I am delighted to announce another batch of books which will be on sale in July and August. Our very first BRILL SPECIAL will be on sale at W H Smith High Street shops and most specialist book and model shops, and of course directly from us - staggeringly priced at only £9.99 for an 80 page card backed book. We are also proud to announce the final volume of THE BOOK OF THE BLACK 5s Part Five. This is all topped off with two more in our Steaming Sixties series, No.10 SCOTTISH SHEDS SWANSONG and No.11 THE ULSTER TRANSPORT AUTHORITY. Finally another colour book - Terence Dorrity's Part 2 of WEST MIDLANDS INDUSTRIAL STEAM IN COLOUR. keep an eye on the magazines for futher announcements.

Best wishes

George Reeve

Last updated 25 June 2015

New Books and Magazines

BRITISH RAILWAYS ILLUSTRATED SPECIAL No.1 - Steam to Diesel on the Southern

BRITISH RAILWAYS ILLUSTRATED SPECIAL No.1 - Steam to Diesel on the Southern

9.99

PUBLISHED AUGUST

Editor Chris hawkins

Loco Town, South London

British Railways organised its sheds – to be designated Motive Power Depots – on the LMS model established in the 1930s. This in theory had a ‘concentration’ depot at the head of a Motive Power District with an ‘A’ code and subordinate ‘garage’ depots. Repairs and maintenance would be, literally, concentrated on the ‘concentration’ depot while the ‘garages’ served in a way that their title suggested, with much less attention carried out. Even on the LMS, however, anomalies abounded, in which the ‘A’ shed possessed little in respect of repair facilities while nominally ‘garage’ sheds were much better equipped and so it is little wonder that while, on the pages of the Ian Allan abc, the sheds of every Region seemed to arranged precisely alike, the codings often meant little more than that. Each Region had its shed codes organised on the LMS model but as for the activities at the sheds themselves, these went on much as they had done under the Southern, GWR, LNER and indeed much as they had done on the pre-Group companies that had preceded them. So it was that in London 73A ‘East’ met 70A ‘West’ curiously within a short stroll of each other, in a somewhat down at heel corner of London near to the Thames.

The old LSW lines and the terminus at Waterloo were served by the ancient and rambling premises at Nine Elms while the principal shed for the old Brighton and Chatham sections had emerged as Stewarts Lane. More or less the entire range of Southern locomotives could be found at one time or another in this closely confined area of Battersea and it is principally through the mirror of this remarkable London ‘locomotive town’ that it’s possible to illustrate the variety of Southern Region steam in the early 1950s, finishing up this BRILL Special with the Southern’s very own main line diesel fleet.
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The Book of the BLACK 5s - LM Class 5 4-6-0s Part 5 44658-44799, 44997-44999

The Book of the BLACK 5s - LM Class 5 4-6-0s Part 5 44658-44799, 44997-44999

28.95

PUBLISHED JULY

By Ian Sixsmith

Part 5 completes this series, with the Caprottis and the final LMS and BR-built locomotives. As we’ve discovered, the Black 5s were not all the same – far from it. The story has unfolded in an approximate chronological sequence, which makes sense – at least more sense than other approaches. So the books are arranged in the order in which the locomotives were introduced, with an added twist that particularly in matters such as boilers and tenders there is a certain amount of back and forward cross-referencing. Some details are covered in more depth in the earlier books and only summarised in the later parts.


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THE STEAMING SIXTIES No.10 Scottish Sheds Swansong

THE STEAMING SIXTIES No.10 Scottish Sheds Swansong

12.99

ON SALE JULY

By Paul Anderson

There were 44 coded sheds in Scotland during BR days and with one exception all of them lasted until the 1960s. In addition around forty sub-sheds and a number of signing-on points were in use. St Margarets, in the east end of Edinburgh, was a classic example of a shed having outstations, no less than eight sub-sheds and eleven signing-on points existing at one time or another. There were little sheds like Helmsdale and Forres, with an allocation of just five locos some time during the 1950s and enormous depots such as St Margarets, with 221 engines in 1950 and Polmadie in Glasgow with 182 in 1959. Each shed had its own character and the allocation reflected its duties. In 1950, nine out of twelve locos at Fort William were named K2s and K4s, the balance being three 0-6-0s for goods. At the same time, the six residents of Helensburgh were all V1 2-6-2Ts for suburban passenger work. Also in 1950, only three of the 35 engines at Grangemouth were classed as passenger locos. Then there were the two main sheds with Pacifics and other large engines for express passenger trains, Polmadie serving the West Coast south from Glasgow Central and Haymarket for East Coast services out of Edinburgh Waverley. This book is a glimpse of locos on shed in Scotland during the last decade of steam, although a few interesting 1959 views have been included. It is obviously not comprehensive as everything depended on where A.G. Forsyth ventured, when he went (the weather was always vital for success) and what he decided to photograph. Haymarket, St Margarets and Dalry Road in Edinburgh are featured, but in their declining days. The same applies to Polmadie, Eastfield and Corkerhill in Glasgow. Perth and Dundee are covered well, as are less celebrated sheds such as Bathgate and Dunfermline. There is also an impression of the final years at Thornton, Ferryhill and Stirling. Hints of Hawick, Dawsholm, Balornock, Ardrossan and Kittybrewster are included. Finally, the sub-shed at Montrose gets a look-in and two immaculate locos are seen at Inverurie Works. The reader will no doubt enjoy seeing several engines in sparkling condition, including WD 2-8-0s. Not every BR loco was disgracefully filthy in the 1960s!
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STEAMING SIXTIES No.11 The Ulster Transport Authority

STEAMING SIXTIES No.11 The Ulster Transport Authority

12.99

ON SALE JULY

By Terence Dorrity

In the 1960s railways in Ireland were run by the Ulster Transport Authority (UTA) in the North and Córas Iompair Éireann (CIE) in the Republic. Like British Railways and CIE, the UTA was the result of nationalisation of the railways and it also included bus services and road haulage under its remit. Although obviously not part of British Railways the UTA network was, in a sense, the United Kingdom’s seventh railway region. At the time that the photographs in this book were taken, in 1963 and 1964, there was still a lot of railway activity to see and a fleet of steam locomotives that was very much to the British taste. The most numerous NCC locomotives, the WT class 2-6-4Ts and the W class 2-6-0s, clearly showed their LMS Derby roots. The ex-GNR(I) locomotives were of particular interest. A number of them were 4-4-0s, a wheel arrangement that was becoming rare in Britain at the time, and some of them still carried the GNR(I) blue livery and names. Steam locomotives could be seen hauling express, local and freight trains. There were two busy operational steam sheds in Belfast, at Adelaide and York Road and, among others, a roundhouse at Portadown. It was all shortly to end, but with the pictures in this book we can relive a little the swansong of steam in Ireland.


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WEST MIDLANDS INDUSTRIAL STEAM IN COLOUR PART 2

WEST MIDLANDS INDUSTRIAL STEAM IN COLOUR PART 2

12.99

ON SALE JULY

By Terence Dorrity

As in the sister book of non-National Coal Board industrial locomotives, all the photographs in this volume were taken in the West Midlands area as it was considered to be in the 1960s. This covered a wider area than the West Midlands region as it is to be found today and included the present West Midlands region around Birmingham and Coventry, the ‘Black Country’ parts of Staffordshire and Worcestershire and the county of Warwickshire. Collieries in this region were at the time divided into two NCB areas: Cannock Chase (Area 2) and Warwickshire (Area 4). These collieries had been nationalised on what was termed ‘Vesting Day’: 1 January 1947. The considerable industry in this area depended greatly on coal either directly delivered to the factories or, more often by that time, indirectly in the form of electricity or gas generated and produced from coal. The huge quantities of this bulk raw material were obviously best transported by rail and this needed interchange sidings, branches to the mines, systems within the mining area serving washeries etc. Not surprisingly, the NCB continued using coal fired steam engines for longer than most industrial systems and in the 1960s there were some real veterans and a number of unusual types in use. Most of them were saddle tanks but there were also some side tanks and three ex-British Railways pannier tanks as well as a very special 0-4-4-0 Beyer Garratt. Those mines which were a distance away from the main lines or where there were severe gradients needed powerful locomotives to haul the heavy loads. All in all, there was quite a variety of motive power to be seen and this book contains a visual record of almost all of the National Coal Board steam locomotives that were to be found in the area at the time.
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TWILIGHT OF SOUTHAMPTON'S TRAMS - Images of their Final Years

TWILIGHT OF SOUTHAMPTON'S TRAMS - Images of their Final Years

14.95

OUT NOW!

By DAVE MARDEN

Only a small and dwindling proportion of Southampton’s population will remember its trams as it is now 65 years since the last one ran to carry passengers on 31st December 1949, setting off from the Floating Bridge for Shirley at around 11.00pm. Festooned with lights and amid crowds of onlookers it rattled off into history.
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RAILWAY BYLINES JUNE 20.7

RAILWAY BYLINES JUNE 20.7

BRILL JUNE 24.9

BRILL JUNE 24.9
 

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